My lost fortnight

I tried with Invisible Women; I agreed with the premise, I just really, really didn’t like the writing.  I might have tried too much:  I found myself attempting to regain my equilibrium by binge watching all the Avenger and Thor movies in order of release.  That swallowed my weekend, and possibly swung me a little too far into the testosterone range, and so I spent the last week binge watching all 8 seasons, plus the recent 9th, of The Gilmore Girls, a series I didn’t originally watch more than a handful of episodes from.

I’d probably still be binge watching, but I can’t get ahold of Bones without paying for a Disney+ membership, and luckily, a couple of new books arrived that immediately appealed to me, so I think I’m back on an even keel again.  I’m currently re-reading an old Lynn Truss collection called Making the Cat Laugh and I’ve just started Ovidia Yu’s new release The Mushroom Tree Mystery.

In other news, I’m hobbling along without crutches or boot pretty much exclusively now, with my first outdoor foray yesterday (grass is so much more challenging than you’d think it would be).  Still not allowed back to working on site for a few more weeks, but with the COVID rally we have going on, I’m ok with that.

Pikachu gave us a right royal scare on Wednesday by becoming violently ill in the morning and spent the day in the hospital.  The vet eliminated all the obvious suspects, and we’re left with a diagnoses of PUO: pyrexia of unknown origin.  Helpful.  Fortunately, she came home Wednesday night and a follow up on Thursday morning had the vet deciding she would be fine.  She spent most of Thursday on my lap, and in the late afternoon, dragged her favourite toy into the library and laid it at my feet – her way of declaring herself healthy and ready to get on with life.

This is why I don’t do FridayReads

I’ve ditched Tell Me No Lies by Shelley Noble.  I was rolling my eyes before I finished page 2.   It will probably be a DNF, but I’ll hold off in case my mood becomes more benevolent (Ha!).

Instead, I started A Perilous Perspective by Anna Lee Huber, which is one of my favourite Historical Mystery series.  Or was, until the last book when the MC spawned a daughter.  Now it’s all blah, blah, blah, baby, blah, blah, blah, motherhood, blah, blah, blah, feedings.  I realise that motherhood was an undeniable consequence of living in the 1800’s, and I mean no disrespect to all those that think motherhood is all that and a glass of wine, but I dislike motherhood mixing with my mysteries, and the couple in this book have more than enough resources to do the historically accurate thing and park said kid with nanny and wet nurse and lets get on with the mystery solving.  But noooo, Lady Darby is going to be one of THOSE mothers, who insist on dragging the child (and her nanny) all over god’s creation while she and Gage investigate.  One big happy family.  UGH.

I’m going to hold out and see if the novelty wears off for the main characters, or Huber just runs out of raptures over motherhood; the mystery, when we finally got around to it, is about art forgery.

In the meantime, I’ve also shopped my TBR shelf and found 2 more books: Still Life with Bread Crumbs by Anna Quindlen, and The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Bartlett.

The Man Who Loved Books Too MuchThe Man Who Loved Books Too Much
by Allison Hoover Bartlett
isbn: 9781594488917
Publication Date: January 1, 2009
Pages: 274
Genre: Books and Reading, Non-fiction
Publisher: Riverhead Books

Rare-book theft is even more widespread than fine-art theft. Most thieves, of course, steal for profit. John Charles Gilkey steals purely for the love of books. In an attempt to understand him better, journalist Allison Hoover Bartlett plunged herself into the world of book lust and discovered just how dangerous it can be.

Gilkey is an obsessed, unrepentant book thief who has stolen hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of rare books from book fairs, stores, and libraries around the country. Ken Sanders is the self-appointed "bibliodick" (book dealer with a penchant for detective work) driven to catch him. Bartlett befriended both outlandish characters and found herself caught in the middle of efforts to recover hidden treasure.

With a mixture of suspense, insight, and humor, she has woven this entertaining cat-and-mouse chase into a narrative that not only reveals exactly how Gilkey pulled off his dirtiest crimes, where he stashed the loot, and how Sanders ultimately caught him but also explores the romance of books, the lure to collect them, and the temptation to steal them. Immersing the reader in a rich, wide world of literary obsession, Bartlett looks at the history of book passion, collection, and theft through the ages, to examine the craving that makes some people willing to stop at nothing to possess the books they love.


Still Life with Bread CrumbsStill Life with Bread Crumbs
by Anna Quindlen
isbn: 9781400065752
Publication Date: January 1, 2014
Pages: 252
Genre: Fiction
Publisher: Random House

Still Life with Bread Crumbs begins with an imagined gunshot and ends with a new tin roof. Between the two is a wry and knowing portrait of Rebecca Winter, a photographer whose work made her an unlikely heroine for many women. Her career is now descendent, her bank balance shaky, and she has fled the city for the middle of nowhere. There she discovers, in a tree stand with a roofer named Jim Bates, that what she sees through a camera lens is not all there is to life.

Brilliantly written, powerfully observed, Still Life with Bread Crumbs is a deeply moving and often very funny story of unexpected love, and a stunningly crafted journey into the life of a woman, her heart, her mind, her days, as she discovers that life is a story with many levels, a story that is longer and more exciting than she ever imagined.


A Perilous PerspectiveA Perilous Perspective
by Anna Lee Huber
isbn: 9780593198469
Series: A Lady Darby Mystery #10
Publication Date: April 19, 2022
Pages: 389
Genre: Fiction, Historical, Mystery
Publisher: Berkley

Argyll, Scotland. July 1832. After a trying few months in Edinburgh, Kiera and her husband and investigative partner, Sebastian Gage, are eager to escape to the Highlands with their three-month-old child. Kiera is overjoyed for her cousin Rye and her detractor-turned-friend Charlotte who are being wed in a private ceremony at the estate of Rye’s great-uncle, the Marquess of Barbreck, in what seems to be the perfect wedding party.

But when Kiera is invited to peruse Barbreck’s extensive art collection, she is disturbed to discover that one of his most priceless paintings seems to be a forgery. The marquess’s furious reaction when she dares to mention it leaves her shaken and the entire house shocked. For it turns out that this is not the first time the word forgery has been uttered in connection with the Barbreck household.

Matters turn more ominous when a maid from a neighboring estate is found murdered where the forged painting hangs. Is her death connected to the forgeries, perhaps a grisly warning of what awaits those who dare to probe deeper? With unknown entities aligned against them, Kiera and Gage are forced to confront the fact that they may have underestimated their opponent. For they are swiftly made to realize that Charlotte’s and Rye’s future happiness is not the only issue at stake, and this stealthy game of cat and mouse could prove to have deadly consequences.


Weekend Reading

I normally have two books on the go at any time – one fiction, and one non-fiction – and it’s rare that I finish them at the same time, but today is one of those days.  And it’s Friday, so I figure, what the hey, I’ll do a version of Friday Reads.

So the two books I’ve selected are:

The Bookshop at 10 Curzon Street: Letters between Nancy Mitford and Haywood Hill 1952-1973The Bookshop at 10 Curzon Street: Letters between Nancy Mitford and Haywood Hill 1952-1973
by John Saumarez Smith (Editor)
isbn: 9780711224520
Publication Date: January 1, 2004
Pages: 191
Genre: Non-fiction
Publisher: Frances Lincoln

This collection of previously unpublished correspondence with Heywood Hill is filled with gossip about life in Paris, tales of her writing life, and her own personal request for books. Hill in turn provides news of customers - many of whom were the elite of post-war London - and reports on how Mitford's books were being revived in London. It is an intimate and charming look at a world that has all but disappeared and will appeal to anyone interested in postwar English literature and/or high society.


Did you know Nancy Mitford worked in a bookshop?  I did not, and having just finished Don’t Tell Alfred recently, this seemed a timely choice.

Tell Me No LiesTell Me No Lies
by Shelley Noble
isbn: 9780765398741
Series: Lady Dunbridge Mystery #2
Publication Date: May 11, 2019
Pages: 364
Genre: Fiction, Historical, Mystery
Publisher: Forge

A modern woman in 1907, Lady Dunbridge is not about to let a little thing like the death of her husband ruin her social life. She’s ready to take the dazzling world of Gilded Age Manhattan by storm.

With the elegant Plaza Hotel and The Metropolitan Museum of Art as the backdrop, romance, murder, and scandals abound. Someone simply must do something. And Lady Dunbridge is happy to oblige.


I read the first book in this series and remember very, very little, but I have a vague idea that I sort of liked it.  So I bought the second one.  We’ll see.

My weekend reading plans

I’ve been communing a lot with my TBR shelves recently and as I whittle away the long-languishing books the communing is taking longer and longer, but this morning the shelves spoke quickly and loudly: Miss Benson’s Beetle and it felt right and good.

Miss Benson's BeetleMiss Benson's Beetle
by Rachel Joyce
isbn: 0857521993
Publication Date: June 11, 2020
Pages: 389
Genre: Fiction
Publisher: Doubleday

Margery Benson's life ended the day her father walked out of his study and never came back. Forty years later, abandoning a dull job, she advertises for an assistant. The successful candidate is to accompany Margery on an expedition to the other side of the world to search for a beetle that may or may not exist. Enid Pretty is not who she had in mind. But together they will find themselves drawn into an adventure that exceeds all Margery's expectations, eventually finding new life at the top of a red mountain.

This is a story that is less about what can be found than the belief it might be found; it is an intoxicating adventure story and it is also a tender exploration of a friendship between two unforgettable women that defies all boundaries.


I also continue to whittle away at Histories of the Unexpected and I’m about half-way through.  Maybe, maybe, maybe I can get through the rest of it this weekend.  If I push.  It’s killing my average days to read curve.

Histories of the UnexpectedHistories of the Unexpected
by James Daybell, Sam Willis
isbn: 9781786494122
Publication Date: October 1, 2018
Pages: 467
Genre: History, Non-fiction
Publisher: Atlantic Books

In this fascinating and original new book, Sam Willis and James Daybell lead us on a journey of historical discovery that tackles some of the greatest historical themes - from the Tudors to the Second World War, from the Roman Empire to the Victorians - but via entirely unexpected subjects.

You will find out here how the history of the beard is connected to the Crimean War; how the history of paperclips is all about the Stasi; how the history of bubbles is all about the French Revolution. And who knew that Heinrich Himmler, Tutankhamun and the history of needlework are linked to napalm and Victorian orphans?

Taking the reader on an enthralling and extraordinary journey through thirty different topics that are ingeniously linked together, Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the everyday world around us as never before.


I’ll leave you with a little Pikacu action, as she quietly reminds me of reading that needs to be done:

My … 10 days in reading? Part 1

I don’t even know how long it’s been.  While my leg continues to improve – and noticeably – the stress levels have gone up because of office politics.

Everybody – and there are a stupid number of people involved in my health at the moment – has been just fine about everything except one person, and she oversees safety/workplace injuries for my company.  She’s gotten a bug up her ass, trying to insist that I be taxied into the corporate office 4 days a week, so I can sit and do exactly the same thing I’m doing from home.   The list of reasons this is wholly impractical is long, and everybody agrees, but she won’t let it go, trying to do end-runs around everybody to get it approved, because she thinks it will be better for me both mentally and physically. 🙄  The surgeon officially shot it down yesterday, in writing, so hopefully, that’s the end of that.

The stress, along with the mind numbing effects of Cisco networking training (what I’m doing from home), have driven me into a massive binge of re-reading.  14 books, read back to back the way a chain-smoker lights his next one with his last, with a mid-binge whiplash from historical mystery into alternate reality fantasy.

I think I’m done now – MT really wants me to be done, because he has 14 books he has to re-shelve, all requiring the ladder, and he’d be happier not to have to fetch any others.  For the record:  I married the perfect man. (For me)  Last night, there was an audible sigh of relieve when I pulled The Book of Forgotten Authors off my TBR shelf.

The second half of my binge was re-reading – again – The Others series by Anne Bishop.  These never, ever, get old for me, and while they are easily the most violent, and at times, goriest books I own, they relax me in a way no other books have.  At my core there’s a very angry misanthrope, and she is soothed by the way justice is always served, usually with a very satisfactory and bloody finality.

I’ve added all the books in the series to the book database, but I won’t do more than add the covers here, as my feelings about each book remain the same as my original reviews.

My week in books

As my leg continues to heal, and I take on more rehab tasks, I’ve had more pain.  In fact, this last week was the first time I’ve had pain significant enough to wish I still had the industrial-level pain pills.  What this has meant to my reading?  Re-reads.  Lots of re-reads.

I spent the week un-plugged and binging on an older cozy mystery series written by Nancy Martin – the Blackbird Sisters series.  They’ve held up beautifully over the years, and are an example of the higher quality cozy mysteries that used to be written before cozies became an assembly-line commodity, written to formula and thrown at the public en masse, hoping a fraction of them will stick.

Most of the series I read before I started documenting my thoughts, so I’ll be writing reviews for those in the next few hours.  Apologies in advance if I spam your feed.

Weekend Reading / TBR project

As a couple of you might know, I’ve decided to try to do the whole spreadsheet tracking thing this year.   Part of the setup is entering your total TBR books, a number I lost control of a couple of years ago during the Great BookLikes Crises.  Having been on crutches the last three months, I haven’t been able to walk around and count them, either, and it seemed way too cheeky to ask MT to do it for me, not to mention the TBR range spans across at least three rooms.

I’m still on crutches, but with more energy, and I’m bored to tears with seeing the books on my bedside TBR bookcase, so this weekend I decided to tackle the counting in stages and at the same time incorporate some swapping of the stock, so to speak, in the hope that some “new” titles next to the bed will re-invigorate my reading.  I started yesterday with the medium sized bookshelf located in my lounge room.  This room is down a small set of floating stairs from the rest of the house so I only get to spend time in it when MT is here.  I’m good on the crutches, but it seems like a Very Bad Idea to tackle floating (highly varnished) stairs when I’m alone in the house.

I pulled the books off and re-arranged them, setting aside the ones that made me go “ooh” or “hmm”.  The set-aside pile came to 26 books:

A couple of these are ‘read-in-a-day’ reference type books I can easily process off the pile, and in fact, I’ll be posting a review of the first one after I finish this post.  Of the rest, 2 immediately caught my attention, and I started reading them yesterday:

VenomVenom
by Eivind Undheim, Ronald Jenner
isbn: 9781486308378
Publication Date: October 1, 2017
Pages: 208
Genre: Natural Science, Science
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing

A fully illustrated guide to venom, its evolution in different animal groups, its effects and its treatments.
When we enter the world of venom, we enter the realm of one of the most diverse, versatile, sophisticated and deadly biological adaptations ever to have evolved on Earth.

Since it first appeared in ancient jellyfish and sea anemones, venom has proved so effective that it has since evolved independently in dozens of different animal groups. The authors reveal the many unique methods by which venomous animals deliver their cocktail of toxins and how these disrupt the physiology of the victims.

Jenner and Undheim also consider how humans have learnt to neutralise venom’s devastating effects, as well as exploit the power of venom in innovative ways to create new drugs to treat a variety of serious conditions. Fully illustrated throughout, this illuminating guide will appeal to all those with an interest in the wondrous world of venom.


One Day: The Extraordinary Story Of An Ordinary 24 Hours In AmericaOne Day: The Extraordinary Story Of An Ordinary 24 Hours In America
by Gene Weingarten
isbn: 9780399166662
Publication Date: October 22, 2019
Pages: 375
Genre: History
Publisher: Blue Rider Press

Two-time Pulitzer Prize–winner Gene Weingarten explores the events of a random day in U.S. history, offering a diorama of American life that illuminates all that has changed—and all that hasn’t—in the past three decades.

On New Year’s Day 2013, two-time Pulitzer Prize–winner Gene Weingarten asked three strangers to, literally, pluck a day, month, and year from a hat. That day—chosen completely at random—turned out to be Sunday, December 28, 1986, by any conventional measure a most ordinary day. Weingarten spent the next six years proving that there is no such thing.

That Sunday between Christmas and New Year’s turned out to be filled with comedy, tragedy, implausible irony, cosmic comeuppances, kindness, cruelty, heroism, cowardice, genius, idiocy, prejudice, selflessness, coincidence, and startling moments of human connection, along with evocative foreshadowing of momentous events yet to come. Lives were lost. Lives were saved. Lives were altered in overwhelming ways. Many of these events never made it into the news; they were private dramas in the lives of private people. They were utterly compelling.

One Day asks and answers the question of whether there is even such a thing as “ordinary” when we are talking about how we all lurch and stumble our way through the daily, daunting challenge of being human.


One Day I’ve only read as far as the introduction but was completely absorbed by what I was reading – I’m expecting to enjoy it, especially as I like these snap-shot looks at history; Venom is going to be a bit of science-candy, I think; the introduction feels like it’s aimed at the more urban reader with less practical experience with the venomous side of life, but it’s fully illustrated and seems like a good warm-up to tackling the slightly more in-depth Venomous by Christie Wilcox, also in that pile.

This morning, I pulled 20-ish books off my large bed-side TBR bookshelf and MT will haul those into the lounge to take residence on the medium sized shelf.  They’re still titles I want to read, but I’m so used to seeing, my eyes glide right over them.  The stacks above will take their place in the bedroom, doing their bit to shake up my visual field.  I’ll also tally up the books on both shelves for my spreadsheet, which will leave me only with 2 smallish shelves in the library, of mostly MM Paperbacks, and then I’ll finally be able to more accurately track my efforts to whittle down my TBR.  I hope.

Halloween Bingo Update, October 29; Another Halloween Bingo, done and dusted.

Well, the bingo gods strung me out to the very end, but with today’s call of Reclics and Curiosities my bingo card is complete and I have all the bingos.

I had a lot more fun with Bingo this year that I feared I would back in August, when my reading mojo, and just my overall life mojo was in a perilous state.

Taking a new approach to the game helped revive my enthusiasm to a degree, but by far the most uplifting and energising act I took was working with Christine and Themis-Athena to create a new, private site where the old BL gang could once again join together in an environment conducive to both games and general book conversations.  We’re all drowning in optimism now and I hope this is the start of a new era of bibliophilism for me.

Happy Halloween everyone!

Accumulative reading table with links to reviews below the card.

The spreadsheet:

Bingo Square Date Called Book Title Date Read
Row #1
X Mad Scientists and Evil Geniuses Sep. 7 Naked Brunch Aug. 30
X Stone Cold Horror/Creepy Carnival Sep. 29 Wild Ride Sep. 1
X Vintage Mystery Sep. 23 The Filigree Ball Sep. 16
X Dem Bones Oct. 2 Independent Bones Sep. 14
X Read by Candlelight/Flashlight Oct. 9 The Ex Hex Oct. 4
Row #2
X Murder Most Foul Oct. 11 Charleston Green Sep. 18
X Lethal Games Oct. 18 No Nest for the Wicket Sep. 1
X Spellbound Oct. 22 The Once and Future Witches Aug. 31
X Black Cat Sep. 15 Thornyhold Sep. 13
X Relics and Curiosities Oct. 30 On the Edge Sep. 8
Row #3
X Shifters Oct. 28 Naked Brunch Aug. 30
X Terror in a Small Town Oct. 14 Agnes and the Hitman Sep. 3
X FREE SPACE Like a Charm Sep. 7
X Psych / Highway to Hell Oct. 6 Archive of the Forgotten Sep. 3
X Truly Terrifying Oct. 1 The Cannonball Tree Mystery Sep. 5
Row #4
X Noir Sep. 24 The Big Over Easy Sep. 22
X Genre: Mystery Oct. 5 The Alchemist’s Illusion Sep. 2
X Country House Mystery Oct. 25 Murder Most Fair Sep. 16
X Tropical Terror Sep. 4 The Mimosa Tree Mystery Sep. 4
X Locked Room Mystery Sep. 28 Black Lizard’s Big Book of Locked Room Mysteries Oct. 5
Row #5
X Splatter Oct. 20 Carpe Jugulum Sep. 9
X Cryptozoologist Oct. 10 Bayou Moon Sep. 11
X Plague and Disease Scourged Sep. 3
X In the Dark, Dark Woods Oct. 17 Paper & Blood Sep. 12
X Gallows Humor Sep. 25 Murder Most Fowl Sep. 10
  Wild Card Spell
  Amplification Spell
  Bingo Flip Spell
  Cell Conversion Spell
  Transfiguration Spell
  Double Trouble Spell

Halloween Bingo Update, October 20: 4th and 5th (and 6th) Bingo!

The Splatter square call gets me my 4th and 5th bingo, and it seems I missed seeing a 6th at some point.

They’re dropping like flies now.

I’ve had so much fun this year, and I think next year is going to be even better.

Accumulative reading table with links to reviews below the card.

The spreadsheet:

Bingo Square Date Called Book Title Date Read
Row #1
X Mad Scientists and Evil Geniuses Sep. 7 Naked Brunch Aug. 30
X Stone Cold Horror/Creepy Carnival Sep. 29 Wild Ride Sep. 1
X Vintage Mystery Sep. 23 The Filigree Ball Sep. 16
X Dem Bones Oct. 2 Independent Bones Sep. 14
X Read by Candlelight/Flashlight Oct. 9 The Ex Hex Oct. 4
Row #2
X Murder Most Foul Oct. 11 Charleston Green Sep. 18
X Lethal Games Oct. 18 No Nest for the Wicket Sep. 1
Spellbound The Once and Future Witches Aug. 31
X Black Cat Sep. 15 Thornyhold Sep. 13
Relics and Curiosities On the Edge Sep. 8
Row #3
Shifters Naked Brunch Aug. 30
X Terror in a Small Town Oct. 14 Agnes and the Hitman Sep. 3
X FREE SPACE Like a Charm Sep. 7
X Psych / Highway to Hell Oct. 6 Archive of the Forgotten Sep. 3
X Truly Terrifying Oct. 1 The Cannonball Tree Mystery Sep. 5
Row #4
X Noir Sep. 24 The Big Over Easy Sep. 22
X Genre: Mystery Oct. 5 The Alchemist’s Illusion Sep. 2
Country House Mystery Murder Most Fair Sep. 16
X Tropical Terror Sep. 4 The Mimosa Tree Mystery Sep. 4
X Locked Room Mystery Sep. 28 Black Lizard’s Big Book of Locked Room Mysteries Oct. 5
Row #5
X Splatter Oct. 20 Carpe Jugulum Sep. 9
X Cryptozoologist Oct. 10 Bayou Moon Sep. 11
X Plague and Disease Scourged Sep. 3
X In the Dark, Dark Woods Oct. 17 Paper & Blood Sep. 12
X Gallows Humor Sep. 25 Murder Most Fowl Sep. 10
  Wild Card Spell
  Amplification Spell
  Bingo Flip Spell
  Cell Conversion Spell
  Transfiguration Spell
  Double Trouble Spell

Halloween Bingo Update, October 18: 3rd Bingo!

I got my third bingo!

Lethal Games was today’s call and that gives me my third bingo.

There are only 13 days or so, of bingo left, and I’m down to 5 squares yet to be called, and only one of those calls won’t give me bingos.

I’ve had so much fun this year, and I think next year is going to be even better.

Accumulative reading table with links to reviews below the card.

The spreadsheet:

Bingo Square Date Called Book Title Date Read
Row #1
X Mad Scientists and Evil Geniuses Sep. 7 Naked Brunch Aug. 30
X Stone Cold Horror/Creepy Carnival Sep. 29 Wild Ride Sep. 1
X Vintage Mystery Sep. 23 The Filigree Ball Sep. 16
X Dem Bones Oct. 2 Independent Bones Sep. 14
X Read by Candlelight/Flashlight Oct. 9 The Ex Hex Oct. 4
Row #2
X Murder Most Foul Oct. 11 Charleston Green Sep. 18
X Lethal Games Oct. 18 No Nest for the Wicket Sep. 1
Spellbound The Once and Future Witches Aug. 31
X Black Cat Sep. 15 Thornyhold Sep. 13
Relics and Curiosities On the Edge Sep. 8
Row #3
Shifters Naked Brunch Aug. 30
X Terror in a Small Town Oct. 14 Agnes and the Hitman Sep. 3
X FREE SPACE Like a Charm Sep. 7
X Psych / Highway to Hell Oct. 6 Archive of the Forgotten Sep. 3
X Truly Terrifying Oct. 1 The Cannonball Tree Mystery Sep. 5
Row #4
X Noir Sep. 24 The Big Over Easy Sep. 22
X Genre: Mystery Oct. 5 The Alchemist’s Illusion Sep. 2
Country House Mystery Murder Most Fair Sep. 16
X Tropical Terror Sep. 4 The Mimosa Tree Mystery Sep. 4
X Locked Room Mystery Sep. 28 Black Lizard’s Big Book of Locked Room Mysteries Oct. 5
Row #5
Splatter Carpe Jugulum Sep. 9
X Cryptozoologist Oct. 10 Bayou Moon Sep. 11
X Plague and Disease Scourged Sep. 3
X In the Dark, Dark Woods Oct. 17 Paper & Blood Sep. 12
X Gallows Humor Sep. 25 Murder Most Fowl Sep. 10
  Wild Card Spell
  Amplification Spell
  Bingo Flip Spell
  Cell Conversion Spell
  Transfiguration Spell
  Double Trouble Spell